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Detecting for Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are a common type of wart that appear on the bottom of the foot. They grow on the soles of the

feet, and get their name as this is where the foot is “planted” when it comes down. Those who have plantar warts feel as if they are stepping on a small rock or similar object when they walk, and it is usually painful. Plantar warts are caused by the human papillomavirus type 1, and can be transmitted by contact. The Podiatry Channel provides information on plantar warts.

 

Detecting whether you have a plantar wart or not is usually easy. Plantar warts are hard callous-like growths that are found under the foot. The wart itself begins underneath the skin, so that layers built up and feels like a callous. The skin will become hard and scaly, and may appear white or flesh colored. In some instances, the plantar wart will be identified by small, brownish-black dots found under the skin. Plantar warts may also be grouped together, as they sometimes form clusters. Forces of Nature provides useful information to help you identify planters warts.

 

Plantar warts must be treated properly, and should always be examined by a doctor. Many over-the-counter medications may be the easy answer, but are not recommended because they can destroy the healthy skin cells and tissues around the wart. Most podiatrists will apply a very mild salicylic acid to the plantar wart over a course of a few weeks; this helps the wart to slowly disintegrate. Plantar has important information on plantar wart removal, as well as pictures to help determine if you or someone you know may have plantar wars.

 

There are ways to help prevent plantar warts from occurring in the first place. Walking barefoot is not recommended, and children’s feet should be checked frequently for signs of plantar warts. Socks and shoes should be changed daily, and the feet should always be washed and kept dry. If in contact with someone who has warts, direct skin-to-skin contact should be avoided. A podiatrist visit is also recommended once a year for prevention. The Mayo Clinic and Articles Base are great organizations to start with.

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